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Carrongrange High School Green Roof

Green roofs, when designed well, provide homes for a range of wildlife, especially pollinating insects, and can be used and enjoyed by people to.  A green roof installed at Carrongrange High School in Grangemouth is doing just that!

The 300m2 roof garden, installed in 2017, was planted with a range of plants, including Chive, Heathers, Sedums, Lambs ear and a wildflower mat which included a diverse mix of native species. The garden was designed to allow access for pupils and teachers along the entire length of the roof and a cobbled path that goes from one end to another is wide enough to allow access for wheel chairs.

In May 2018, Buglife along with staff from the Inner Forth Landscape Initiative ran three workshops with the schools gardening club. Each workshop invited pupils onto the roof garden to show them the different plants on the roof and the wildlife feeding on them. These workshops also provided opportunities for the pupils to learn how to maintain the garden and what plants to weed and remove.

   

During the workshops, pupils enjoyed seeing Small copper butterflies, all stages of Seven spot ladybird, Red tailed bumblebees and the leafhopper Cicadella viridis. Not only does this roof provide outdoor space for pupils to use for learning but it provides space for them to sit and relax. Teachers have also enjoyed the use of the garden in lunchtimes and when using it with pupils.

Since the workshops, Buglife have returned to the roof to weed it before the new term started in August 2018. We added in some new herbs, including Thyme, Rosemary, Lavender and Marjoram, that will be great for pollinators but also nice for pupils to touch and smell.

Glorious Green Roofs is an Inner Forth Landscape Initiative project funded by Heritage Lottery Fund and the contribution of the LIFE financial instrument of the European Community delivered as part of the EcoCo LIFE project: https://www.buglife.org.uk/campaigns-and-our-work/habitat-projects/glorious-green-roofs

The roof was installed by ICB (Projects) Ltd. And has won an award for best Green Roof Installation at the NFRC Scottish Roofing Contractor of the Year Awards 2017.

Water Voles in the City

The Greater Easterhouse Green Infrastructure (GI) project focuses on redeveloping 3 parks in the east end of Glasgow. At the heart of the project is the creation of new surface water management features, including daylighted water courses, swales and detention basins, linked to wider improvements to access, landscape and habitats. This in turn enables development of adjacent vacant and derelict land by reducing pressure in existing drainage networks.

An additional feature of the project is the presence of water voles at all 3 parks. In 2008 biodiversity officers were first alerted to water voles living in rough grasslands along the M8 in Easterhouse. Surveys carried out in partnership with the University of Glasgow revealed a nationally significant population of water voles in parks and greenspaces where grass had been left to grow long – including sites over 1km away from the nearest water course.

Water voles have declined by over 80% across the UK in recent years, so it was a huge surprise to find such a large population thriving in a dense urban areas. Water vole burrows are protected by law – and it is a criminal offence to disturb them without a licence from SNH. For the Greater Easterhouse GI project this has meant trapping and relocating animals from the areas to be re-landscaped – and creating new, permanent grassland and wetland habitat. The challenge now is to ensure ongoing conservation management of this unique grassland population in an area earmarked for significant development and regeneration.

Water vole burrow at Cranhill Park. Scott Ferguson

 

Greening the Grey

The University of Glasgow have been working on a NERC Integrated Green Grey Infrastructure Funded project called Greening the Grey, with the aims of addressing gaps in the knowledge of how we green the parts of our cities and towns that need to remain grey for their primary function like seawalls, pavements and bridges. The project report has recently been completed. 

This report has several key features: 

  • The first UK synthesis of measures that can be used to green grey non-building assets such as bridges, coastal flood alleviation structures, street furniture and linear assets like railways. 
  • It provides an evidence-based directory of measures that can be used to help Green the Grey, drawing on the latest scientific research and innovations in practice from around the UK and beyond. 
  • Historic, urban, mowing and coastal environments are covered including 14 case studies, 22 one page Art-of-the-Possible examples and 16 bite sized Art-of-the-Possible vignettes. 
  • A critical success factors framework has been created to evaluate the multifunctional benefits of green grey solutions compared to business-as-usual grey engineering options. 
  • The framework has been used to provide cost-benefit comparisons for the case studies and art-of-the-possible examples. 

The report can be downloaded in different formats:

The project will be continuing for another 12 months to help embed the Greening the Grey/ Integrated Green Grey Infrastructure (IGGI) concept within organisations and learn how it has been helpful in informing policy and practice.   

Angus MacDonald MSP hails success of Grangemouth Green Roof project

Angus MacDonald SNP party member for Falkirk East enjoyed a trip to a green roof opposite CalaChems reception on the 16th of April. Angus was joined by John Walker (CalaChem Building and Estates Manager), Suzanne Burgess (Buglife Scotland Manager) and Christopher Langton (from Bauder) to discuss the importance of green roofs and other green infrastructure for wildlife and people.

CalaChems green roof is over 140m2 in size and was installed in May 2015 through the Glorious Green Roof project with funding from HLF and EU life funds through EcoCo. This Inner Forth Landscape Initiative project has helped to create a stepping stone for wildlife allowing them to move and mix across the area of Grangemouth. Last year wildflowers on the roof including Kidney vetch, Thrift and Oxeye daisy provided forage for bumblebees, butterflies and even 7-spot ladybirds! An Oystercatcher also nested on the roof!

As well as providing habitat for wildlife at roof level, green roofs have a number of other benefits, including cooling the building in summer and insulating it in winter, reducing noise pollution and flooding, as well as increasing the lifespan of the roof!

Angus MacDonald MSP enjoyed his visit to the biodiverse roof and learning how it is benefitting the local area as well as CalaChem. This spring we will add extra wildflowers that will provide further forage opportunities for bees and other pollinators.

Photograph by Iain Sinclair