Green and blue infrastructure in Glasgow's East End

The green and blue infrastructure project in Greater Easterhouse will use and develop the area's natural resources to encourage use of local parks and other high-quality green and water spaces, creating drainage capacity to facilitate regeneration, reducing flooding and protecting local wildlife. It is being delivered by Glasgow City Council in partnership with Scottish Natural Heritage and the Metropolitan Glasgow Strategic Drainage Partnership - the latter funded through the Glasgow City Region City Deal.
 
The project will see improvements to greenspaces in Blairtummock, Cranhill and Ruchazie and aims to increase access to high quality greenspace - including links to the Seven Lochs Wetland Park. It will provide the surface water drainage solution for residential and commercial developments, reduce flood risk through improved surface water management; and create connected habitat networks for the area's grassland water voles.
 
Scottish Natural Heritage is providing funding for these works through the European Regional Development Fund, which will be match-funded by the Glasgow City Region City Deal through the Metropolitan Glasgow Strategic Drainage Partnership. For more information click here

Green and blue infrastructure in Glasgow's East End

The green and blue infrastructure project in Greater Easterhouse will use and develop the area's natural resources to encourage use of local parks and other high-quality green and water spaces, creating drainage capacity to facilitate regeneration, reducing flooding and protecting local wildlife. It is being delivered by Glasgow City Council in partnership with Scottish Natural Heritage and the Metropolitan Glasgow Strategic Drainage Partnership - the latter funded through the Glasgow City Region City Deal.
 
The project will see improvements to greenspaces in Blairtummock, Cranhill and Ruchazie and aims to increase access to high quality greenspace - including links to the Seven Lochs Wetland Park. It will provide the surface water drainage solution for residential and commercial developments, reduce flood risk through improved surface water management; and create connected habitat networks for the area's grassland water voles.
 
Scottish Natural Heritage is providing funding for these works through the European Regional Development Fund, which will be match-funded by the Glasgow City Region City Deal through the Metropolitan Glasgow Strategic Drainage Partnership. For more information click here

2018 SURF awards

This year marks the 20th anniversary of Scotlands' Regeneration Forums SURF’s awards. This annual awards process is delivered in partnership with the Scottish Government and is open to all community regeneration projects in Scotland that are currently in place or that have been completed within two years of the closing date. The purpose of the SURF Awards is:

- To recognise and reward best practice and innovation in community regeneration;
- To promote and disseminate best practice across Scotland as means of sharing knowledge and experience, and thereby enhancing future policy and practice;
- To highlight the role that regeneration projects have in improving the well-being of individuals and communities.

This year, there are five categories: Scotland’s Most Improved Place, Housing, Creative Regeneration, Youth Employability: Overcoming Barriers, Community Led Regeneration. To submit your application see here.

How much pollution does vegetation remove in your area?

Overall, an estimated 1.4 billion kg of air pollutants were removed by woodlands, plants, grasslands and other UK vegetation in 2015, according to a study produced for the UK Natural Capital accounts by the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology. This pollution removal saved the UK around £1 billion in avoided health damage costs. The Office for National Statistics published an interactive map showing pollution removed by green infrastructure across the UK. Type in your postcode and take a look at your local area here 

Seattles' Green Stormwater Infrastructure

Green Stormwater Infrastructure (GSI) uses natural processes like rain gardens and cisterns to slow, capture, and clean polluted runoff before it harms our lakes, rivers, and streams. It also helps add color and beauty to our homes and communities

In 2013, Seattle set a target to manage 700 million gallons of polluted runoff per year with green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) by 2025. This is being addressed through City Council led projects. inclusion of guidance within the Seattle Stormwater Code, and a community focused media campaign. More information can be found here.